Okudzhava

The image of Lermontov in the Soviet poetry and Meeting by Bulat Okudzhava

The article examines the literary context of one of the most important poems of Bulat Okudzhava. Special emphasis is placed on the pattern of making a classic poet a myth in the belles-lettres of the Soviet era. The connections of the poem Meeting with Lermontov’s poetry are noted, the functions of reminiscences are examined. The place of Lermontov’s image in the ‘poetic mythology’ of Okudzhava’s poetry is defined.

The Poem by Bulat Okudzhava My Son’s Tin Soldier in the Cultural and Historic Context of the 1960s

The poem by Okudzhava is comprehended against the background of a number of texts published during the celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Patriotic War. Okudzhava’s unique stand in the situation of the historic celebration is determined, the controversy with Levitansky’s poem The Little Man is traced. It is shown how Andersen’s formula of the ‘persistent tin soldier’ is transformed in Okudzhava’s point of view. The views of Okudzhava and Samoilov on literature about the war are compared.

XIXth Century Image in B. Okudzhava’s Poetry: to the Question of the Motif Correlation in the Writer’s Poetic and Prosaic Texts

The article reveals problematic and thematic correlation and associative links that appear on the motif level between B. Okudzhava’s prose and poetry within the framework of the Decembrist problem range.

The Poet’s Roses: the Poem of Bulat Okudzhava «I don’t Want to Write…» in the Context of Classical Tradition

Okudzhava’s poem is regarded in the context of the classical poetics of rose, in the background of the traditional situation «farewell to the lira». The parallels with Pushkin’s, Batyushkov’s, Boratynsky’s and Khodasevich’s poetry are drawn.

The Poem of Bulat Okudzhava «You’re not Drunkards, You’re not Vagrants…»: the Dialogue with Blok on the Background of Kipling

In the article Blok’s tradition is revealed in the image of the Beautiful Lady in Bulat Okudzhava’s poetry (an early poem by Okudzhava “You’re Not Drunkards, You’re Not Vagrants…” is taken as an example). Kipling’s motives in the poem also add to the recognition of Blok’s tradition.